Athrabeth

a Tolkien Podcast

Tag: sindarin

Episode 15: Tolkien’s Languages: Part 1

    <p><a href="https://discord.gg/B2ZWfKz">Join Athrabeth's Discord!</a></p><h3>References, Notes and Useful Links</h3><ul><li>Brackmann, Rebecca. “‘Dwarves Are Not Heroes’: Antisemitism and The Dwarves in J.R.R. Tolkien's Writing.” Mythlore, vol. 28, no. 3, 10 Apr. 2010. 109/110 Spring/Summer.<ul><li><a href="https://dc.swosu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1172&amp;context=mythlore">https://dc.swosu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1172&context=mythlore</a></li></ul></li><li>Tolkien reciting namarie: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6de_SbVUVfA">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6de_SbVUVfA</a></li><li>Tolkien singing namarie: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkuHrD_xlJY">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkuHrD_xlJY</a></li><li>Hostetter, Carl F. “Elvish as she is spoke” <a href="http://www.elvish.org/articles/EASIS.pdf">http://www.elvish.org/articles/EASIS.pdf</a></li><li><a href="http://www.elvish.org/gwaith/movie_elvish.htm">http://www.elvish.org/gwaith/movie_elvish.htm</a></li><li>Convenient condensed writeups of the various Tolkien languages covered<ul><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Valarin - like the Glitter of Swords.” Ardalambion, folk.uib.no/hnohf/valarin.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Various Mannish Tongues - the sadness of Mortal Men?” Ardalambion, folk.uib.no/hnohf/mannish.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Quenya - the Ancient Tongue” Ardalambion, folk.uib.no/hnohf/quenya.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Sindarin - the Noble Tongue” Ardalambion, folk.uib.no/hnohf/sindarin.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Adûnaic - the vernacular of Númenor” Ardalambion,folk.uib.no/hnohf/adunaic.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li><li>Fauskanger, Helge K. “Orkish and the Black Speech - base language for base purposes” Ardalambion, folk.uib.no/hnohf/orkish.htm (accessed 8 September 2019)</li></ul></li></ul><h3>Sources</h3><ul><li>J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Qenya Phonology", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 22</li><li>J.R.R. Tolkien, "Quenya Phonology", in Parma Eldalamberon XIX (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 22</li><li>J.R.R. Tolkien, "Quenya Grammar", in Parma Eldalamberon XIX (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 28-34</li><li>J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 12</li><li>Letter 176. In H. Carpenter and C. Tolkien (Eds.), The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien.New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin</li><li>Gilson and Wynne, ‘The Growth of Grammar in the Elven Tongues’ 1992</li><li>Gilson, Christopher, “<i>Narqelion</i> and the Early Lexicons. Some Notes on the First Elvish Poem”, in Vinyar Tengwar 40 (edited by Carl F. Hostetter), p. 6</li><li>Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lost Road and Other Writings. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. Vol. 5. Boston &amp; New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1987. Print. History of Middle­ earth.</li><li>Tolkien, J.R.R. Sauron Defeated. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. Vol. 9. Boston &amp; New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1992. Print. History of Middle­ earth.</li><li>Tolkien, J.R.R. War of the Jewels. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. Vol. 10. Boston &amp; New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1993. 301­66. Print. History of Middle ­earth.</li><li>Tolkien, J. R. R. “Appendices” in The Lord of the Rings. Allen &amp; Unwin.</li></ul>

Episode 5 Extras: Names

 

A note about elven names

Elves have a lot of names A LOT OF NAMES. Often these names are significant and/or portentous. They can have three kinds of “Anessi”, given names.

  • The first is the fathername (we dont have an actual word for fathername in quenya), given at birth.

  • The second, amilessë, is the “mother name” and is given later in life. Mothers were thought to have insight, often prophetic, into their childrens character, so mothernames had a great deal of significance.

  • Epessë, “afternames”, were names or titles of honor either granted to the elf or self chosen.

  • There is a fourth kind of name, the Kilmessë, which is chosen by an elf once they are “capable of lámatyáve” which is to say “fluent enough to take joy in individual sounds and words”. This name was a private name, though not secret, and using it without permission was considered presumptuous or an insult.

Fun Fact about Valar Names

While Melkor’s names, as you will see below, are traditionally quenya and sindarin, he is actually the exception to the rule. The other Valar’s names, while often having both quenya and sindarin forms, are based on their names in YET ANOTHER language Tolkien invented, called Valarin. This language is BONKERS WEIRD. It barely counts as a “language” as Tolkien only really sketched out some words and a bit of structure but its cool to see.

Fëanor

Fëanor: sindarin rendering of his amilessë, Fëanáro, meaning “spirit of fire”.

Curufinwë: quenya, his fathername, meaning “skillful son of Finwë”

Melkor/Morgoth

Melkor – quenya, lit. “mighty rising”, translated in the Silmarillion as “he who arises in Might”

Morgoth – sindarin for “dark foe”

Sauron

While the translation of Sauron as a quenya word meaning “The Abhored” is pretty consistent, the origin for this word went through a number of iterations over time. the elfdict entry for the word has a great rundown.

Gwaith-i-Mírdain

pronunciation: gweyeth-ee-mear-deyen

sindarin for “the People of the Jewel-smiths”

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